Funding

 

There’s a lot that’s gone into this game to get us to this point. From software, equipment, hiring external talent, and sheer time – none of this would have been possible without money.

AIE logoBack in 2013 both Tristian (artist and writer) and Lex (designer, programmer, and Certified Unity Wizard) began study at the Academy of Interactive Entertainment. AIE is a vocational college with campuses from Sydney to Seattle that teaches digital art for games and film, as well as programming and game design. Alumni have gone on to work at game and film studios like Rockstar, Weta, or Dreamworks.

In 2016 we successfully applied for the AIE Incubator Project Grant, a program that provides financial support for alumni students to bring their prototypes to a commercial release, and were awarded funding to work on Death of Magic.

It’s hard to overstate the impact this funding has had. While much of it has gone toward essential software or tools we needed to make our game, we’ve been able to stretch it much further than that. Here’s just some of the things we’ve been able to accomplish.

Contractors

We’ve put a lot of money back into the Australian game’s industry by hiring –

  • a vocal talent and production company
  • a voice acting director
  • seven different voice actors, some of them in their first role
  • a background artist
  • a sound designer and composer

Conventions

We’ve been able to support and attend a number of different conventions –

  • GX Aus
    • attended in 2016 as an exhibitor
    • attended in 2017 as a sponsor
    • backed the 2017 follow-up Kickstarter by buying pay-it-forward tickets
  • GaymerX 4
    • sponsored the original Kickstarter campaign
    • travelled from Australia to San Diego to attend the convention
    • gratuitously over-tipped at every opportunity
  • GaymerX East
    • we supported the recent Kickstarter for their New York event
  • Melbourne International Games Week (twice!)
    • MIGW includes events like PAX Aus and GCAP
    • we’ve been able to meet and network with other game devs
    • we’ve attended panels and talks to continue learning

Other Developers

We’ve also put our money behind other game projects and Kickstarters we believe in, including –

And this isn’t even including what we’ve put toward Australian and indie games on Steam and Humble Bundle, the creators we back monthly on Patreon, or the individual artists and writers we’ve supported at conventions.

The AIE grant has allowed us to take time to work on this project, to hire experts, and to pay them promptly at proper industry rates, but one of my favourite things is that we’ve been able to lend us our support to other developers. There are so many talented and hardworking game devs in Australia, and many of those people don’t have the resources they need. When someone asks, “Hi, can you buy this thing I made?” it’s been awesome to be able to say “Yes!” I am immensely grateful for that.

Where have we been?

It’s been a little while since GXAus in April, and those of you who met us then might be wondering what’s happening with the demo. We’d hoped to have it online shortly after the convention, but lining up the schedules of voice talent, direction, and sound/music people has taken longer than expected.
We’re taking the opportunity to re-record some characters to ensure consistency across all voices, and are making sure the music is the best it can be.
The second we’re able to, we’ll be putting the demo up on our website and itch.io so you can download and have a play for yourself (and show your friends!). We’ll be initially releasing for PC and Mac, with hopefully an Android build soon after.

What’s next?

Chapter One

The 20-30 minute demo we showcased at GXAus constitutes only a small portion of our whole game. The whole story – where Jackin is thrust into deciding the future of the empire – takes place over the course of a week. The demo is just a snippet from Monday morning.
We’ll be splitting the game up into six chapters for episodic release, with each chapter constituting roughly a day of game time, so our next milestone will be getting Chapter One into your hands.

Live2D 3

My favourite part of our game is the range of characters, and the fact that I’ve been able to create moving, breathing, emotive animations from 2D drawings is really exciting. The software that allows this, Live2D, has recently undergone a major update, so we’ll be updating our cast to the new format. Of course the software is also made in Japan and English documentation is tricky to find, so teaching myself how it all works can take time.
While it’ll take time to update our character rigs and animations to the new format, we’ll be able to do much better work with them down the line.

MIGW

A mentor of mine once said that in game development, while you can plan out the next few months, after that you’re just telling stories. As such, while we’d be super keen to be at Melbourne Games week again and to show off our demo at PAX, we can’t make promises on how far our funding will go. Our first priority is to pay our talent promptly and properly, and we’ll see what we can do for convention tickets afterwards.
Rest assured we’ll still be plugging away on the game. Melbourne’s amazing coffee might just have to wait…

GX Aus 2017

Image may contain: 2 peopleWe’ve finally resurfaced after GX Australia. While it’s sad that it was the last one (for now?) we still had a lot of fun. It was fantastic to meet up with other game devs and even better to show off the demo to new people!

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Character model progress

Work progresses in our next stretch to GXAus, with voice acting and background art in production. The main bulk of what has to be done before then is character sprites – someone has to tell this story, right?

Each character is built from a 2D drawing in Paint Tool Sai which is then cut up and rigged as a 3D-looking model in Live2D. To use version 1.0 of Thuost, he begins at this,

– then is split up into this –

– which can then be animated like so:

The various elements of the face can be complicated, but it’s far more interesting to deal with characters that have six limbs, or wings.

We’ll be updating our Patreon with some other examples of character sprites, as well as some new short fiction. To get an early peek at what we’re up to, drop by and donate a dollar or two.

MIGW 2016

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Melbourne International Games week is a collection of events that celebrate both members of the industry and games in general. There are opportunities for professional development as well as more commercial events that let developers interact with their audiences.
While we’ve been to PAX Aus in years gone by, this year we focussed on Unite (showcasing games made with Unity as well as presentations and talks about potential uses of Unity) and GCAP (Game Connect Asia Pacific, which focuses on skills development and education for industry people).

Unite and GCAP

There was a huge amount to see and do at both conferences, and even splitting up to go to talks seperately there was only much we were able to see. Lex was impressed by a Unite talk by Maya Kerr and Ngoc Vu on how to create a hand drawn anime style using 3d models in Unity, as was done in Guilty Gear. My favourite presentation at GCAP was The Art of Making Thing Not Look Terrible, a summary of art principles as they pertain to game design, presented by Simon Boxer and Jacob Janerka. All industry talks are better with party poppers.
Another important talk, while not exactly an enjoyable one, was Mental Health for Game Development by Jennifer Hazel of Checkpoint. There’s a pervasive culture in game dev that if you’re not working until you drop, you’re not really working hard enough. The documentary Indie Game gives you a glimpse of what effect this has on developers. The physical and mental impact of burnout is huge, and particularly important to deal with for developers working alone.
In addition to professional development, GCAP and Unite also host a number of networking events for attendees. Being based in Sydney, away from the main hub of Australian game talent in Melbourne, this was a chance for us to meet and mingle with a new crowd of people. We were able to finally meet face to face with both our composer, Tamara Violet Partridge, and our voice talent director Kevin Powe.

Women in Games Lunch

I was also lucky enough to be invited to the Women in Games Lunch hosted by Film Victoria. This event both celebrates women working in games, and allows us a chance to network with colleagues and catch up with friends. This year’s guest speaker was Kim McAuliffe, a game designer from Seattle who’s worked on everything from shooters to The Sims series. Hearing the range of work she’s done on different types of games and in different roles was hugely inspiring.
In regard to networking, I know of one person already who’s managed to land a new job from a contact she met at the lunch, so that’s cool 🙂

What Next?

After taking some time to recover from MIGW (and GX Santa Clara before that) our next goal is GX Aus in April next year. In the meantime, we’ll be updating our Patreon monthly with new art and fiction, and with progress updates as they happen.
Yes, that’s right, we have a Patreon! Feel free to share it around. Even if you aren’t able to support financially, getting the word out is a huge help.

GaymerX 4 by the numbers

Hours from Sydney to San Jose: 15
Days at the con: 3
Servings of caffeine: averaging 4/day
Buttons handed out: 117
Cards handed out: 62
Flyers handed out: 57
Fun had: lots

GX4 swag

It seems almost hard to believe but GX4 is over and done. As exhausted as we are, we had a fantastic time. We got to meet a huge range of people, see a couple of talks, and do some shopping to support other indie developers. I only wish there were more of me so I could have seen more of the con!

Having been to a few other conferences, some more commercial and some more industry focussed, GX is still very much our favourite. Everyone is respectful, friendly, and so happy to be there – there’s nothing quite like the way people light up when they’re safe to be themselves. We’re extremely grateful that we were able to contribute and be a part of everything, and look forward to coming back again.

In the meantime, the Kickstarter for GXAus 2017 is gearing up, and Tyandae is a sponsor. We’ll have a booth here in April next year where we’ll be launching the fully voiced, professionally scored – and free – demo of Death of Magic. Even if you can ‘t make it to Australia you can still chip in a few dollars or just spread the word.

GX 4

It’s o20160930_112820nly day one of GX 4 and already we’ve met a bunch of great people. In days to come we’d also love a chance to follow up and hear about your experiences of the con – drop by our forums and say hello!

Buttons

badge-designs

So as anyone who has ever seen my backpack will attest, I am a fan of badges (or buttons, depending on where you live). Now, thanks to the tireless work of the other half of the Tyandae development team and the people at Pure Buttons, we have Death of Magic buttons to show off at GX4.

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Character spotlight – Kyros and Saral

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Magic affects everyone differently. When magic is weak people get sick, pixies go feral, and minotaurs forget. During the drought of 451, when heatwaves swept the city and there were riots in the outer districts, a young minotaur boy was found lost and alone. When asked his name, he said “I don’t remember.”

Lorel, a centaur matriarch, took the boy into her herd and named him Kyros. He grew up alongside a number of other foundlings from the outer city, learning to reach out and help others regardless of their race. When he started his own business and opened a public eating house in the outer city, he called it the Bar None in Lorel’s honour, making a place where all would be welcome. When a tired dwarf carrying a sick child on kaj’r back knocked on the door, Kyros was able to offer work and a place to stay.

It’s been a long time since Saral first moved in to the Bar None. Since then magic has grown thinner, prices higher, and Kyros’ mood crystal is less and less effective. When Jackin first came to live with them he’d recite poetry to send her to sleep – now he can barely read.